Hitting the Wall – #TSQL2sDay

farrel-nobel-97504-unsplashPhoto by Farrel Nobel on Unsplash

Welcome to another edition of T-SQL Tuesday!

This T-SQL Tuesday is hosted by Wayne Sheffield ( blog | twitter ) and he has asked us to talk about

[…] a time when you ran up against your own brick wall, and how you worked it out or dealt with it.

Hitting The Wall

When stuck in a problem in the past, I could often be found glued to a keyboard and screen for many hours. I would try this way and that way, I would Google and read Stack Overflow looking for ways around the particular issue I was seeing trying different things and finally I would get frustrated and fed up and stop.

Maybe I would go and walk the dog, maybe just sit somewhere else but I would often find that I had an idea how to solve my problem and quickly go back to the keyboard frustrated that I hadnt thought about this earlier and frequently rinse and repeat.

A Different Way

It took me many years to realise this and I wish I had done so sooner but once I made the connection that leaving the problem to one side for a little while meant that I often found a way to a solution for a problem I started setting a time limit.

30 minutes

If I have been stuck on a problem for 30 minutes, I (mostly, I still sometimes fail at this) stop, take a break, go for a walk or do something different and the number of times that I arrive if not at a solution then at a path to a solution is remarkable.

Ask

The other thing to do at this point in the troublesome problem solving is to ask. Twitter, Google, Slack, Stack Overflow. These are all excellent resources where you can quickly find people who are willing and capable of helping.

Don’t be like me and take years to work this out 🙂

A PowerShell Pester Check for parsing SQL scripts

I like to write Pester checks to make sure that all is as expected! This is just a quick post as much to help me remember this script 🙂

This is a quick Pester test I wrote to ensure that some SQL Scripts in a directory would parse so there was some guarantee that they were valid T-SQL. It uses the SQLParser.dll and because it was using a build server without SQL Server I have to load the required DLLs from the dbatools module (Thank you dbatools 🙂 )

It simply runs through all of the .sql files and runs the parser against them and checks the errors. In the case of failures it will output where it failed in the error message in the failed Pester result as well.

You will need dbatools module installed on the instance and at least version 4 of the Pester module as well

dbachecks – Dark Mode Historical Validation PowerBi

in my last post I showed how you can save the results of dbachecks to a database and created a PowerBi report. Inspired by Frank Henninger in the #dbachecks slack channel and Shawn Melton who explained the difficulties with red/green colour blind I then created this one 🙂

dark mode

You can find it in my GitHub and have a play with it below

Happy Validating!

dbachecks – Save the results to a database for historical reporting

I gave a presentation at SQL Day in Poland last week on dbachecks and one of the questions I got asked was will you write a command to put the results of the checks into a database for historical reporting.

The answer is no and here is the reasoning. The capability is already there. Most good PowerShell commands will only return an object and the beauty of an object is that you can do anything you like with it. Your only limit is your imagination 🙂 I have written about this before here. The other reason is that it would be very difficult to write something that was easily configurable for the different requirements that people will require. But here is one way of doing it.

Create a configuration and save it

Let’s define a configuration and call it production. This is something that I do all of the time so that I can easily run a set of checks with the configuration that I want.

Now I can export that configuration to a json file and store on a file share or in source control using the code below. This makes it easy to embed the checks into an automation solution
and then I can use it with
01 - Invoke-DbcCheck
I would use one of the Show parameter values here if I was running it at the command line, probably fails to make reading the information easier

Add results to a database

This only gets us the test results on the screen, so if we want to save them to a database we have to use the PassThru parameter for Invoke-DbcCheck. I will run the checks again, save them to a variable

Then I can use the dbatools Write-DbaDatatable command to write the results to a table in a database. I need to do this twice, once for the summary and once for the test results

and I get two tables one for the summary

02 - summary

and one for the details

03 - detail
This works absolutely fine and I could continue to add test results in this fashion but it has no date property so it is not so useful for reporting.

Create tables and triggers

This is one way of doing it. I am not sure it is the best way but it works! I always look forward to how people take ideas and move them forward so if you have a better/different solution please blog about it and reference it in the comments below

First I created a staging table for the summary results

and a destination table with a primary key and a date column which defaults to todays date

and added an INSERT trigger to the staging table

and for the details I do the same thing. A details table

A stage table

with a trigger

Then I can use Write-DbaDatatable with a couple of extra parameters, FireTriggers to run the trigger, Truncate and Confirm:$false to avoid any confirmation because I want this to run without any interaction and I can get the results into the database.

detail with stage

Which means that I can now query some of this data and also create PowerBi reports for it.

To enable me to have results for the groups in dbachecks I have to do a little bit of extra manipulation. I can add all of the checks to the database using

But because the Ola Hallengren Job names are configuration items I need to update the values for those checks which I can do as follows

You can get a sample Power Bi report in my Github which also has the code from this blog post

Then you just need to open in PowerBi Desktop and

Click Edit Queries
Click Data Source Settings
Click Change Source
Change the Instance and Database names

09 - PowerBi

Then have an interactive report like this. Feel free to click around and see how it works. Use the arrows at the bottom right to go full-screen. NOTE – it filters by “today” so if I haven’t run the check and the import then click on one of the groups under “Today’s Checks by Group”

This enables me to filter the results and see what has happened in the past so I can filter by one instance
05 - filter by instance
or I can filter by a group of tests
07 - filter by instance
or even by a group of tests for an instance
08 - filter by instance and insance

Hopefully, this will give you some ideas of what you can do with your dbachecks results. You can find all of the code and the PowerBi in my GitHub

Happy Validating!

dbachecks – Improved Descriptions

With the latest release of dbachecks we have added a new check for testing that foreign keys and constraints are trusted thanks to Cláudio Silva b | t

To get the latest release you will need to run

You should do this regularly as we release new improvements frequently.

We have also added better descriptions for the checks which was suggested by the same person who inspired the previous improvement I blogged about here

Instead of the description just being the name of the check it is now more of a, well, a description really 🙂

This has the added effect that it means that just running Get-DbcCheck in the command line will not fit all of the information on a normal screen

01 - get-dbccheck.png

You can use the Format-Table command (or its alias ft at the command line) and select the properties to display using

02 - get-dbccheck format table

or you can use Format-List (or its alias fl at the command line)

03 get-dbccheck format list.png
Or you can use Out-GridView (or its alias ogv at the command line) (Incidentally, could you also thumbs up this issue on Github to get Out-GridView functionality in PowerShell 6)
04 - get-dbacheck ogv
Happy Validating !

dbachecks – Which Configuration Item For Which Check ?

I love showing dbachecks to people. It’s really cool seeing how people will use it and listening to their experiences. I was showing it to a production DBA a month or so ago and he said

How Do I Know Which Checks There Are?

OK you just need to run

and it will show you

01 - get-dbcchecks.png

It will show you the group, the type (does it need a computer name or an instance name), The description, the unique tag for running just that check and all the tags that will run that check

OK he said, you talked about configurations

How Do I Know Which Configurations There Are?

So to do that you just need to run

and it will show you

02 - dbcconfig.png

You can see the name, the current value and the description

Ah thats cool he said so

How Do I Know Which Configuration Is For Which Check?

Well, you just…. , you know…… AHHHHHHH

Ping – light bulb moment!

It’s always really useful to give something you have built to people who have never seen it before and then listen to what they say. Their new eyes and different experiences or expectations will give you lots of insight

None of the amazing contributors to dbachecks had thought of this scenario so I decided to fix this. First I asked for an issue to be raised in GitHub because an issue can be an improvement or a suggestion not just a bug.

Then I fixed it so that it would do what was required. Thank you Nick for this feedback and for helping to improve dbachecks

I improved Get-DbcCheck so that now it shows the configuration item related to each check

It is easier to see (and sort or search) if you use Out-GridView

03 - New dbccheck.png

So now you can see which configuration can be set for each check!

 

Happy Validating!

Creating SQL Server Containers for versions 2012-2017

I am working on my dbatools and dbachecks presentations for SQL Saturday Finland, SQLDays, SQL Saturday Cork and SQLGrillen I want to show the two modules running against a number of SQL Versions so I have installed

  • 2 Domain Controllers
  • 2 SQL 2017 instances on Windows 2016 with an Availability Group and WideWorldImporters database
  • 1 Windows 2016 jump box with all the programmes I need
  • 1 Windows 2016 with containers

using a VSTS build and this set of ARM templates and scripts

I wanted to create containers running SQL2017, SQL2016, SQL2014 and SQL2012 and restore versions of the AdventureWorks database onto each one.

Move Docker Location

I redirected my docker location from my C:\ drive to my E:\ drive so I didnt run out of space. I did this by creating a daemon.json file in C:\ProgramData\docker\config and adding

and restarting the docker service which created folders like this
01 - folders.png
Then I ran
to create a volume to hold the backups that I could mount on the containers

AdventureWorks Backups

I downloaded all the AdventureWorks backups from GitHub and copied them to E:\containers\volumes\sqlbackups\_data

Getting the Images

To download the SQL 2017 image from the DockerHub I ran

and waited for it to download and extract

I also needed the images for other versions. My good friend Andrew Pruski b | t has versions available for us to use on his Docker Hub  so it is just a case of running

and waiting for those to download and extract (This can take a while!)

Create the containers

Creating the containers is as easy as

so all I needed to run to create 4 SQL containers one of each version was

and just a shade over 12 seconds later I have 4 SQL instances ready for me 🙂

02 - creating containers.png

03 - Containers at the ready.png

Storing Credentials

This is not something I would do in a Production environment but I save my credentials using this method that Jaap Brasser b | t shared here

which means that I can get the credentials in my PowerShell session (as long as it is the same user that created the file) using

Restoring the databases

I restored all of the AdventureWorks databases that each instance will support onto each instance, so 2017 has all of them whilst 2012 only has the 2012 versions.

First I needed to get the filenames of the backup files into a variable

and the container connection strings, which are the hostname and the port number

then I can restore the databases using dbatools using a switch statement on the version which I get with the NameLevel property of Get-DbaSqlBuildReference-
I need to create the file paths for each backup file by getting the correct backups and appending the names to C:\SQLBackups which is where the volume is mounted inside the container
As Get-DbaDatabase gives the container ID as the Computer Name I have highlighted each container below
04 - databases.png
That is how easy it is to create a number of SQL containers of differing versions for your presentations or exploring needs
Happy Automating!

#tsql2sday – Giving Back – Reprise

Itsql2sdayt’s TSQL Tuesday again! This month our host is Riley Major (b/t) and the subject is Giving Back. He’s given us two options here (as well as the side option of your favorite 2017 improvement). Pick a way that you’d like to give back to the community and talk about it, or if you already give back,  tell us how and why you started.

 

There will be a lot of excellent posts on this subject and one of the things that I like is that you can go to http://tsqltuesday.com and look up all of the entries which means that for a particular topic you can find a bunch of blog posts from different angles (I miss-typed that as angels first and yes they are all angels!) whether it is career improvement or technical like say Extended Events it is all there waiting for you 🙂

I wrote about giving back in 2014 when I was about to help organise SQL Saturday Exeter for the first time. Last year I blogged about a few of the wonderful people who made a difference to me. So this post is a little about how I give back and also hopefully some hints that can help you to do the same as well.

How

There are so many ways that you can give back to the community as Riley’s post shows.

Sharing your knowledge is a good way. I share my knowledge in blog posts and in sessions at user groups and at conferences. You can too.

From beginner, introductory posts and talks to expert level deep dives every single one of us has learned from the blog posts that other people have spent their time and effort creating.

YOU can share your knowledge, even if you have only been using a technology for a few months, you have knowledge of the things you have learned and the things that would have made it easier. Write a post about those things.

Answering questions is another way. You can do this on Stack Overflow, SQL Server Central, PowerShell.Org , Reddit, Facebook , on Twitter using the #sqlhelp or #PowerShellHelp or just in person. I try to answer questions when I see them on twitter or in the SQL Community Slack

Mentoring or just providing feedback to people. You can offer to proof read blog posts or abstract submissions or you can listen to peoples presentations. I do this and it is a lot of fun

I also share my knowledge via my GitHub. All of my presentations slides and code are available as well as other code that I use. I also contribute to open-source projects such as dbatools and dbachecks.  You can do this too. You could open an issue for an improvement or bug. You can contribute your code, even if you are not confident writing the code you can fix spelling mistakes or add documentation., everything helps

You can help with organisation of events. I have helped to organise the PowerShell Europe Conference, PSDay.UK, SQL Saturday Exeter, SQL SouthWest user group, PASS PowerShell Virtual Group. I have also helped with session choices for a number of other events like SQL Grillen and SQLGLA and I have volunteered at many events from SQL Saturdays to SQL Bits. Everything from setting up and tearing down (IE moving heavy things and cleaning up rubbish) to sitting on the information desk, giving out badges, making sure the speakers are on time in their sessions. You can do this too. Just ask the organisers of the events what they need. It is better to do this prior to the event than on the day but I am sure all help is welcomed. Richard Munn and I talked (waffled?) about this at SQL Bits this year

If you would like to be considered as a volunteer for next years SQL Bits please email helpers at sqlbits.com

Why

So why did I start giving back?

I wanted to be useful. I saw the amount of work that Jonathan and Annette were doing organising SQL Saturday Exeter and SQL South West. I hoped that I could help them with that.

Why do I carry on doing it?

Because it is fun 🙂 I enjoy speaking, I enjoy sharing my knowledge and talking to people

That is good but there is more to it as well

You learn so much by writing a presentation or a blog post because you will do research.

You will learn even more when people ask you questions in your sessions or leave comments on your blog posts and you have to go and find the answers

You learn new and useful skills and demonstrate your knowledge to potential employers

My blog is a scrapbook of knowledge that I go back to and use all the time (and sometimes I forget that I have written something and find my own post in the search results!)

But the most important reason is that I feel that it pays back some of the benefit that I have gained from all of those people who’s time and effort I made use of for free when I was learning and continue to do so to this day. All of those blog posts and videos and presentations that I consumed have helped to make me the technician I am today. I have skills and abilities that I would not have without them all and by giving back I hope that I am enabling others to develop and see the benefit of sharing so that they will continue to do so in the future and I can learn from them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional and Proficient PowerShell: From Writing Scripts to Developing Solutions at PASS Summit

PASS Summit is the largest conference for technical professionals who leverage the Microsoft Data Platform. PASS Summit 2018 is happening November 5th – 9th 2018 in Seattle. It is an amazing conference. I attended last year and thoroughly enjoyed every minute. It is a whole week of opportunities to learn from and network with people from all over the world involved in Data Platform.

The pre-cons have just been announced so go and take a look at the Pre-Con Page to see the wonderful full day learning opportunities you can get this year.

I am immensely honoured to say that on Tuesday 6th November you can join me for a whole day of PowerShell learning 

I will pass on as much of the skills and knowledge I have learnt using PowerShell with SQL Server (and other technologies) that I can fit in one day. I want you to leave feeling more confident in using PowerShell to automate away all of the mundane. In particular I want to enable you to have the skills to write professional PowerShell solutions.

You can read more and sign up here

If you have any questions about this session please feel free to contact me. You can use any of the various social media sites, or via the contact page or in person if you see me.

 

Checking Availability Groups with dbachecks

It’s been 45 days since we released dbachecks

Since then there have been 25 releases to the PowerShell Gallery!! Today release 1.1.119 was released 🙂 There have been over 2000 downloads of the module already.

In the beginning we had 80 checks and 108 configuration items, today we have 84 checks and 125 configuration items!

If you have already installed dbachecks it is important to make sure that you update regularly. You can do this by running

If you want to try dbachecks, you can install it from the PowerShell Gallery by running

You can read more about installation and read a number of blog posts about using different parts of dbachecks at this link https://dbatools.io/installing-dbachecks/

HADR Tests

Today we updated the HADR tests to add the capability to test multiple availability groups and fix a couple of bugs

Once you have installed dbachecks you will need to set some configuration so that you can perform the tests. You can see all of the configuration items and their values using

get-config.png

You can set the values with the Set-DbcConfig command. It has intellisense to make things easier 🙂 To set the values for the HADR tests

  • app.cluster requires one of the nodes of the cluster.
  • app.computername requires the windows computer names of the machines to run operating system checks against
  • app.sqlinstance requires the instance names of the SQL instances that you want to run SQL checks against (These are default instances but it will accept SERVER\INSTANCE)
  • domain.name requires the domain name the machines are part of
  • skip.hadr.listener.pingcheck is a boolean value which defines whether to skip the listener ping check or not. As this is in Azure I am skipping the check by setting the value to $true
  • policy.hadr.tcpport is set to default to 1433 but you can also set this configuration if your SQL is using a different port
NOTE – You can find all the configuration items that can skip tests by running
skips.png
Now we have set the configuration (For the HADR checks – There are many more configurations for other checks that you can set) you can run the checks with
check results.png
This runs the following checks
  • Each node on the cluster should be up
  • Each resource on the cluster should be online
  • Each SQL instance should be enabled for Always On
  • Connection check for the listener and each node
    • Should be pingable (unless skip.hadr.listener.pingcheck is set to true)
    • Should be able to run SQL commands
    • Should be the correct domain name
    • Should be using the correct tcpport
  • Each replica should not be in unknown state
  • Each synchronous replica should be synchronised
  • Each asynchronous replica should be synchonising
  • Each database should be synchronised (or synchronising) on each replica
  • Each database should be failover ready on each replica
  • Each database should be joined to the availability group on each replica
  • Each database should not be suspended on each replica
  • Each node should have the AlwaysOn_Health extended event
  • Each node should have the AlwaysOn_Health extended event running
  • Each node should have the AlwaysOn_Health extended event set to auto start

(Apologies folk over the pond, I use the Queens English 😉 )

This is good for us to be able to run this check at the command line but we can do more.

We can export the results and display them with PowerBi. Note we need to add -PassThru so that the results go through the pipeline and that I used -Show Fails so that only the titles of the Describe and Context blocks and any failing tests are displayed to the screen

results.png

This will create a file at C:\Windows\Temp\dbachecks and open the PowerBi report. You will need to refresh the data in the report and then you will see

dbachecks.png

Excellent, everything passed 🙂

Saving Configuration for reuse

We can save our configuration using Export-DbcConfig which will export the configuration to a json file

so that we can run this particular set of tests with this comfiguration by importing the configuration using Import-DbcConfig

In this way you can set up different check configurations for different use cases. This also enables you to make use of the checks in your CI/CD process. For example, I have a GitHub repository for creating a domain, a cluster and a SQL 2017 availability group using VSTS. I have saved a dbachecks configuration to my repository and as part of my build I can import that configuration, run the checks and output them to XML for consumption by the publish test results task of VSTS

After copying the configuration to the machine, I run

in my build step and then use the publish test results task and VSTS does the rest 🙂
VSTS results.png