Version Update, Code Signing and publishing to the PowerShell Gallery with VSTS

At the fabulous PowerShell Conference EU I presented about Continuous Delivery to the PowerShell Gallery with VSTS and explained how we use VSTS to enable CD for dbachecks. We even released a new version during the session 🙂

So how do we achieve this?

We have a few steps

  • Create a project and link to our GitHub
  • Run unit uests with Pester to make sure that our code is doing what we expect.
  • Update our module version and commit the change to GitHub
  • Sign our code with a code signing certificate
  • Publish to the PowerShell Gallery

Create Project and link to GitHub

First you need to create a VSTS project by going to https://www.visualstudio.com/ This is free for up to 5 users with 1 concurrent CI/CD queue limited to a maximum of 60 minutes run time which should be more than enough for your PowerShell module.

01 - sign up.png

Click on Get Started for free under Visual Studio Team Services and fill in the required information. Then on the front page click new project

02 - New Project.png

Fill in the details and click create

03 - create project.png

Click on builds and then new definition

04- builds.png

next you need to link your project to your GitHub (or other source control providers) repository

05 - github auth.png

You can either authorise with OAuth or you can provide a PAT token following the instructions here. Once that is complete choose your repo. Save the PAT as you will need it later in the process!

06 - choose repo.png

and choose the branch that you want this build definition to run against.

07 branch.png

I chose to run the Unit Tests when a PR was merged into the development branch. I will then create another build definition for the master branch to sign the code and update module version. This enables us to push several PRs into the development branch and create a single release for the gallery.

Then I start with an empty process

08 - empty process.png

and give it a suitable name

09 - name it.png

i chose the hosted queue but you can download an agent to your build server if you need to do more or your integration tests require access to other resources not available on the hosted agent.

Run Unit Tests with Pester

We have a number of Unit tests in our tests folder in dbachecks so we want to run them to ensure that everything is as it should be and the new code will not break existing functionality (and for dbachecks the format of the PowerBi)

You can use the Pester Test Runner Build Task from the folk at Black Marble by clicking on the + sign next to Phase 1 and searching for Pester

10 - Pester task runner.png

You will need to click Get It Free to install it and then click add to add the task to your build definition. You can pretty much leave it as default if you wish and Pester will run all of the *.Tests.ps1 files that it finds in the directory where it downloads the GitHub repo which is referred to using the variable $(Build.SourcesDirectory). It will then output the results to a json file called Test-Pester.XML ready for publishing.

However, as dbachecks has a number of dependent modules, this task was not suitable. I spoke with Chris Gardner  b | t  from Black Marble at the PowerShell Conference and he says that this can be resolved so look out for the update. Chris is a great guy and always willing to help, you can often find him in the PowerShell Slack channel answering questions and helping people

But as you can use PowerShell in VSTS tasks, this is not a problem although you need to write your PowerShell using try catch to make sure that your task fails when your PowerShell errors. This is the code I use to install the modules

I use the Configuration module from Joel Bennett to get the required module versions for the required modules and then add the path to $ENV:PSModulePath so that the modules will be imported. I think this is because the modules did not import correctly without it.

Once I have the modules I can then run Pester as follows

As you can see I import the dbachecks module from the local folder, run Invoke-Pester and output the results to an XML file and check that there are no failing tests.

Whether you use the task or PowerShell the next step is to Publish the test results so that they are displayed in the build results in VSTS.

Click on the + sign next to Phase 1 and search for Publish

12 - publish test results.png

 

Choose the Publish Test Results task and leave everything as default unless you have renamed the xml file. This means that on the summary page you will see some test results

 

13 - Test on sumary page.png

and on the tests tab you can see more detailed information and drill down into the tests

14 - detailed test report.png

Trigger

The next step is to trigger a build when a commit is pushed to the development branch. Click on Triggers and tick enable continuous integration

15 Trigger.png

Saving the Build Definition

I would normally save the build definition regularly and ensure that there is a good message in the comment. I always tell clients that this is like a commit message for your build process so that you can see the history of the changes for the build definition.

You can see the history on the edit tab of the build definition

16 - build history.png

If you want to compare or revert the build definition this can be done using the hamburger menu as shown below.

17 - build history compare revert.png

Update the Module Version

Now we need to create a build definition for the master branch to update the module version and sign the code ready for publishing to the PowerShell Gallery when we commit or merge to master

Create a new build definition as above but this time choose the master branch

18 - master build.png

Again choose an empty process and name it sensibly, click the + sign next to Phase 1 and search for PowerShell

19 - PowerShell task.png

I change the version to 2 and use this code. Note that the commit message has ***NO_CI*** in it. Putting this in a commit message tells VSTS not to trigger a build for this commit.

I use Get-Content Set-Content as I had errors with the Update-ModuleManifest but Adam Murray g | t uses this code to update the version using the BuildID from VSTS

You can commit your change by adding your PAT token as a variable under the variables tab. Don’t forget to tick the padlock to make it a secret so it is not displayed in the logs

20 - variables.png

Sign the code with a certificate

The SQL Collaborative uses a code signing certificate from DigiCert who allow MVPs to use one for free to sign their code for open source projects, Thank You. We had to upload the certificate to the secure files store in the VSTS library. Click on library, secure files and the blue +Secure File button

21 - secure file store.png

You also need to add the password as a variable under the variables tab as above. Again don’t forget to tick the padlock to make it a secret so it is not displayed in the logs

Then you need to add a task to download the secure file. Click on the + sign next to Phase 1 and search for secure

22 download secure file.png

choose the file from the drop down

23 - download secure file.png

Next we need to import the certificate and sign the code. I use a PowerShell task for this with the following code

which will import the certificate into memory and sign all of the scripts in the module folder.

Publish your artifact

The last step of the master branch build publishes the artifact (your signed module) to VSTS ready for the release task. Again, click the + sign next to Phase one and choose the Publish Artifact task not the deprecated copy and publish artifact task and give the artifact a useful name

24 - publish artifact.png

Don’t forget to set the trigger for the master build as well following the same steps as the development build above

Publish to the PowerShell Gallery

Next we create a release to trigger when there is an artifact ready and publish to the PowerShell Gallery.

Click the Releases tab and New Definition

25 - Reelase creation

Choose an empty process and name the release definition appropriately

26 Release name empty process.png

Now click on the artifact and choose the master build definition. If you have not run a build you will get an error like below but dont worry click add.

27 - add artifact.png

Click on the lightning bolt next to the artifact to open the continuous deployment trigger

28 - Choose lightning bolt

and turn on Continuous Deployment so that when an artifact has been created with an updated module version and signed code it is published to the gallery

28 - Continuous deployment trigger

Next, click on the environment and name it appropriately and then click on the + sign next to Agent Phase and choose a PowerShell step

29 - PowerShell Publish step

You may wonder why I dont choose the PowerShell Gallery Packager task. There are two reasons. First I need to install the required modules for dbachecks (dbatools, PSFramework, Pester) prior to publishing and second it appears that the API Key is stored in plain text

30 - PowerShell Gallery Publisher

I save my API key for the PowerShell Gallery as a variable again making sure to tick the padlock to make it a secret

31 - API Key variable.png

and then use the following code to install the required modules and publish the module to the gallery

Thats it 🙂

Now we have a process that will automatically run our Pester tests when we commit or merge to the development branch and then update our module version number and sign our code and publish to the PowerShell Gallery when we commit or merge to the master branch

Added Extra – Dashboard

I like to create dashboards in VSTS to show the progress of the various definitions. You can do this under the dashboard tab. Click edit and choose or search for widgets and add them to the dashboard

32 - Dashboard.png

Added Extra – Badges

You can also enable badges for displaying on your readme in GitHub (or VSTS). For the build defintions this is under the options tab.

33 - Build badges

for the release definitions, click the environment and then options and integrations

34 - Release Badge

You can then copy the URL and use it in your readme like this on dbachecks

35 - dbachecks readme badges.png

The SQL Collaborative has joined the preview of enabling public access to VSTS projects as detailed in this blog post So you can see the dbachecks build and release without the need to log in and soon the dbatools process as well

I hope you found this useful and if you have any questions or comments please feel free to contact me

 

Happy Automating!

How I created PowerShell.cool using Flow, Azure SQL DB, Cognitive Services & PowerBi

Last weekend I was thinking about how to save the tweets for PowerShell Conference Europe. This annual event occurs in Hanover and this year it is on April 17-20, 2018. The agenda has just been released and you can find it on the website http://www.psconf.eu/

I ended up creating an interactive PowerBi report to which my good friend and Data Platform MVP Paul Andrew b | t added a bit of magic and I published it. The magnificent Tobias Weltner b | t who organises PSConfEU pointed the domain name http://powershell.cool at the link. It looks like this.

During the monthly #PSTweetChat

I mentioned that I need to blog about how I created it and Jeff replied

so here it is! Looking forward to seeing the comparison between the PowerShell and Devops Summit and the PowerShell Conference Europe 🙂

This is an overview of how it works

 

You will find all of the resources and the scripts to do all of the below in the GitHub repo. So clone it and navigate to the filepath

Create Database

First lets create a database. Connect to your Azure subscription

01 - subscription.png

Then set some variables

They should all make sense, take note that you need to set and uncomment the login and password and choose which IPs to allow through the firewall

Create a Resource Group

02 - resource group.png

Create a SQL Server

03 - create server.png

Create a firewall rule, I just use my own IP and add the allow azure IPs

03a - firewall rule.png

Create a database

04 - create database.png

I have used the dbatools module to run the scripts to create the database. You can get it using

Run the scripts

05 - Create Table Sproc.png

This will have created the following in Azure, you can see it in the portal

07 - portal.png

You can connect to the database in SSMS and you will see

06 - show table.png

Create Cognitive Services

Now you can create the Text Analysis Cognitive Services API

First login (if you need to) and set some variables

Then create the API and get the key

You will need to accept the prompt

08 -cognitive service

Copy the Endpoint URL as you will need it.Then save one of  the keys for the next step!

09 cognitiveservice key

 

Create the Flow

I have exported the Flow to a zip file and also the json for a PowerApp (no details about that in this post). Both are available in the Github repo. I have submitted a template but it is not available yet.

Navigate to https://flow.microsoft.com/ and sign in

Creating Connections

You will need to set up your connections. Click New Connection and search for Text

16 - import step 3.png

Click Add and fill in the Account Key and the Site URL from the steps above

17 import step 5.png

click new connection and search for SQL Server

18 - import step 6.png

Enter the SQL Server Name (value of $AzureSQLServer) , Database Name , User Name and Password from the steps above

19 - import step 7.png

Click new Connection and search for Twitter and create a connection (the authorisation pop-up may be hidden behind other windows!)

Import the Flow

If you have a premium account you can import the flow, click Import

11 - import flow.png

12 - choose import.png

and choose the import.zip from the Github Repo

13 import step 1.png

 

Click on Create as new and choose a name

14 - import step 2.png

Click select during import next to Sentiment and choose the Sentiment connection

15 impot step 3.png

Select during import for the SQL Server Connection and choose the SQL Server Connection and do the same for the Twitter Connection

20 - import stpe 8.png

Then click import

21 - imported.png

Create the flow without import

If you do not have a premium account you can still create the flow using these steps. I have created a template but it is not available at the moment. Create the connections as above and then click Create from blank.

22 - importblank.png

 

Choose the trigger When a New Tweet is posted and add a search term. You may need to choose the connection to twitter by clicking the three dots

23 - importblank 1.png

Click Add an action

24 - add action.png

search for detect and choose the Text Analytics Detect Sentiment

25 - choose sentuiment.png

Enter the name for the connection, the account key and the URL from the creation of the API above. If you forgot to copy them

26 - enter details.png

Click in the text box and choose Tweet Text

27 - choose tweet text.png

Click New Step and add an action. Search for SQL Server and choose SQL Server – Execute Stored Procedure

28 - choose sql server execute stored procedure.png

Choose the stored procedure [dbo].[InsertTweet]

29 - choose stored procedure.png

Fill in as follows

  • __PowerAppsID__         0
  • Date                                 Created At
  • Sentiment                      Score
  • Tweet                              Tweet Text
  • UserLocation                 Location
  • UserName                      Tweeted By

as shown below

30 stored procedure info.png

Give the flow a name at the top and click save flow

31 flow created.png

Connect PowerBi

Open the PSConfEU Twitter Analysis Direct.pbix from the GitHub repo in PowerBi Desktop. Click the arrow next to Edit Queries and then change data source settings

32 change data source.png

Click Change source and enter the server (value of $AzureSQLServer) and the database name. It will alert you to apply changes

33 apply changes.png

It will then pop-up with a prompt for the credentials. Choose Database and enter your credentials and click connect

34 - creds.png

and your PowerBi will be populated from the Azure SQL Database 🙂 This will fail if there are no records in the table because your flow hasn’t run yet. If it does just wait until you see some tweets and then click apply changes again.

You will probably want to alter the pictures and links etc and then yo can publish the report

Happy Twitter Analysis

Dont forget to keep an eye on your flow runs to make sure they have succeeded.

A Pretty PowerBi Pester Results Template File

I have left the heat and humidity of Singapore where I have been presenting at the PowerShell Conference Asia and DevOpsDays Singapore to travel to Seattle for PASS Summit. During my Green is Good – Red is Bad session someone asked me if the PowerBi that I showed at the end would work with any Pester Test Results object and I said (without thinking) that it would.

It turns out that the PowerBi that I had set up for that session will work with my function to run Pester Tests against an Ola Hallengren installation but some of the formatting and custom columns were specific to that test.

I said that I would share a Power Bi file that people could plug any Pester Test Results into. This is the first iteration of that. I doubt that it will work for every single test but I think it will be a good starting point for people to use.

This is how to use it

Download the file from here.

Run your Pester Tests using the PassThru Parameter and set the results to a variable, you can also use the Show Parameter to reduce the output of the tests to the screen (and also speed up the tests)

Then we convert the $PesterResults object into a JSON file

Open the Power Bi file you downloaded

Click Home

then the words “Edit Queries”

then data source settings,

highlight the filename and click change source

then navigate to the JSON file you just created, click ok and close and the apply changes.

Which will load the data from the JSON file and display your pester results. You can then save this file with a new name and keep the template for other tests.

It’s not going to be perfect

It’s not going to work in all circumstances and I expect that with some test results it will display the results in a less than optimal manner but you should be able to modify this to suit your needs.

Please give it a try and see how you get on

Here is a sample report created with Demo 1 from my Green is Good session

You can click around and change the data you can see and also look at the other 4 pages

Here is another one that I created using my dbatools-scripts repo and a config file. Again, have a click around and see what it does.

 

I also created a quick video showing the process too which I will upload when I am not at 35000 feet!!

Enjoy 🙂 Also, let me know if you think it would be better to have the file in Github which would allow contributions but it would only be seen as a binary file and therefore merging will be difficult. I am happy to do so.

Announcing PSDay.UK – Whats a PSDay?

On Thursday evening I attended the joint London WinOps and PowerShell User Group. It was an excellent evening with two great sessions by Jaap Brasser and Filip Verloy.

PSDay.UK

There was also an exciting announcement about PSDay.UK  https://psday.uk

PSDay.UK is a one day PowerShell event providing the opportunity for you to spend a whole day learning PowerShell from renowned experts from the UK and international speaking community. It will be held at

Skills Matter | CodeNode, 10 South Place, London, EC2M 7EB, GB

on

Friday 22nd September 2017  .ics

We will be running two tracks

  • PowerShell Zero to Hero
  • DevOps with PowerShell

Register your interest

Please go and visit the website and have a look and register your interest to get further notifications about the event.

Follow the @PSDayUK twitter account and Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/PSDayUK/ and keep yourself informed on this fantastic new event.

Want to Speak at PSDay.UK ?

We already have some fantastic speakers lined up but we would like to invite people to send us submissions for more sessions. If you have a PowerShell talk that will fit into one of the tracks and experience of delivering sessions at events please send us submissions via the website.
If you have questions about speaking feel free to contact me via twitter at @sqldbawithbeard

What is a PSDay ?

The International PowerShell community has three main global events which run over a number of days with top notch international speakers and Microsoft PowerShell team members, delivering in-depth information about the latest PowerShell trends and technologies, and connecting national communities with another.

There are a number of other PowerShell events that have been organised by wonderful volunteers in numerous countries and we feel there is an opportunity to create national events which complement the global events and help PowerShell passionates and professionals to get in touch and learn from another with a similar branding of PSDay.

We foresee PSDays to be smaller one day national events promoting speakers from the host country supported by other international speakers with the aim of increasing the exposure of national PowerShell user groups as well as providing excellent PowerShell training.

There will be a board of PowerShell community folk set up who will approve requests to use the PSDay name and shield logo providing the event is professionally organized and offer help with technical questions, viral marketing, and experience. We hope that this will enable people to set up their own PSDay in their own country and increase the exposure of the PowerShell community as well as PowerShell knowledge whilst sharing resources, knowledge, experience and skills and ensuring a good standard of PowerShell community national events.

Further details of this will be forthcoming and we welcome offers of assistance from people with relevant experience

 

 

2016 – That was a Year :-)

Its the time of year for reflection and I have had the most amazing 2016, I am blessed that I love what I do so much. I thoroughly enjoy writing and talking and sharing and commenting and supporting and cherishing all the SQL and PowerShell things. I wrote about using Power Bi to display my checkins. I only started this in June and this is where I have been 🙂

swarm

I learnt about Pester and ended the year incorporating it into dbatools and dbareports. I also started using GitHub It is quite surprising to me how much time I now spend using both. I also had to start learning DSC for the client I was working with because as ‘the PowerShell guy’ I was the one who could the easiest. I learnt things and then forgot them causing me to find this Pester post via google later in the year!! (That’s a big reason for blogging by the way)

Early in the year we organised with SQL Saturday Exeter

Helping to organise a SQL Saturday is a lot of fun, especially when you do it with good friends, but choosing sessions is by far the most challenging part of it for me. I could have chosen at least 60 of these sessions and I know people were disappointed not to have been chosen. I was also the first person many saw at SQL Bits in Liverpool manning the front of house and getting asked the best question ever

The Beard says

When you go to an event –  Say thank you to the organisers and volunteers

and a TERRIBLE thing happened – I broke my DBA Team mug

WP_20160223_07_51_03_Pro.jpg

Luckily the fine folk at redgate sorted me out with a replacement from deep in the stores somewhere and gave it to me at SQL Saturday Exeter 🙂 Thank you.

I spoke at the PowerShell Conference Europe and met and made some great friends which lead to me speaking at the PowerShell Monday in Munich and the Dutch PowerShell Usergroup. SQL Saturday Dublin was a blast, its a wonderful city, Manchester had a whole PowerShell Track 🙂 and Cambridge was memorable for the appalling journey as well as the chance to share a stage with Chrissy. PowerShell Conference Asia in the sovereign city-state of Singapore was such a good event and place. Lastly of course was Slovenia with its fantastic Christmas lights and awesome event organisation. I visited some user groups too. Southampton run by my good friends John Martin and Steph Middleton Congratulations to John on his first MVP award yesterday, Cardiff for the Return of the Battle of the Beards with Terry McCann and Tobiasz Koprowski where the projector threw its toys out of the pram and Birmingham in the school hall which was slightly chilly (theres a joke there for some people)

Amazing things happened

We created https://sqlps.io/vote and https://sqlps.io/ssms and https://sqlps.io/powerbi to enable anyone to influence Microsoft and help to improve the PowerShell SQL experience

and lo and behold there was a new sqlserver module 🙂

I was also invited by Aaron and Chrissy to become an officer for the PASS PowerShell Virtual Chapter oh and we made https://sqlps.io/slack to enable people to talk about all things Data Platform – Another addition to my life that I didn’t have at the beginning of the year. I spend a lot of time in there in the #dbatools and #dbareports channels and have made some fantastic friends. Chrissy and I created the SQL Community Collaborative GitHub team and added dbatools and dbareports and even more friendships were born

And that’s the biggest and bestest thing about this year. Some amazing new friends and spending time with all my other friends. I started writing out a list but was terrified I would have missed someone out, so to all my friends

THANK YOU for a brilliant 2016 and 2017 shall be just as good 🙂

Here are a few of my pics from the year with a lot of my friends

 

PSConfAsia 2016

I have just got back to the UK from Singapore following the amazing PSConfAsia conference. I must say that Matt, Milton, Sebastian and Ben did a fantastic job organising this conference and were proud that there was a notable increase in attendees from last year.

sebastians-photo

 

The conference began (unofficially) with a PowerShell User group session in the Microsoft Offices on Wednesday where Ravi Chaganti spoke about DSC

WP_20161019_19_56_07_Pro (2).jpg

and then Desmond Lee lead a Q and A session. In the end we decided that all the answers were

It Depends and Test in your Environment

That evening, I even managed to jump on the PASS PowerShell Virtual Chapter session by Scott Sutherland Hacking SQL Servers on Scale using PowerShell the recording of which is here  A session organised and managed online in three different time zones by Aaron Chrissy and myself :-).

On Thursday the conference proper started with a pre-con day at the Amazon Web Services office. Yes, you read that right. This conference really highlighted the cross-platform direction and adoption of open-source that Microsoft is taking.  Jason Yoder spent all day teaching a group “PowerShell for Beginners” in one room

WP_20161020_09_24_43_Pro.jpg

while The Amazon Web Services Team showed DevOps on AWS with PowerShell in the morning and June Blender gave a SAPIEN Toolmaking Seminar.fter this we went back to the Microsoft Offices for another User Group where Jason Yoder gave a (nother) session with Jaap Brasser on PowerShell Tips and Tricks (Demo)

WP_20161020_19_26_24_Pro (2).jpg

Friday started with The PowerShell Team represented by Kenneth Hansen & Angel Calvo talking about PowerShell Past, Present and Future. It was really good that there was such great access to the product team at the conference and I saw lots of interaction around the conference as well, in addition to the sessions they provided.

Next up for me was another session from the PowerShell Team, this time Hemant Mahawar & Jason Shirk taking us on a Journey Through the Ages of PowerShell Security

Execution Policy is not a security feature

That took us to lunch, we were treated to excellent lunches at this conference

WP_20161020_12_07_14_Pro (2).jpg

After lunch I sat in the PowerShell Teams Ask Us Anything session although I was mainly preparing for my own session Powershell Profile Prepares Perfect Production Purlieu which followed. There were excellent sessions on JEA, Nano Server, Chef and DSC, Containers, ETS and securing PowerShell against malware whilst I attended Flynn Bundy’s session about Windows Containers and Building GUIs with XAML with David Das Neves

WP_20161021_15_58_12_Pro (2).jpg

That evening, organisers, speakers and attendees all went to the Penny Black pub on Marina Bay and enjoyed some food, refreshments and networking

Saturday started slowly after the rain (another impressive ‘feature’ of Singapore)  but the first session was a brilliant one with Hemant Mahawar & Jason Shirk talking Pragmatic PowerShell and answering questions. I am glad Jason used Carnac to show what he was typing so that people could (just about 🙂 ) keep up. I then attended the excellent session about contribution with Microsoft.

The rest of the day had amazing sessions on Azure Automation, IoT, AWS Cloud Formation, Centralised Repository Server, Chef, Puppet, Professional Help, Nano Server, Docker, DSC, Release Pipeline and of course some bearded fella talking about Installing SQL Scripts and creating Pester Tests for them and combining PowerShell, SQL, SSRS, PowerBi and Cortana 🙂

Jason Yoder's photo.jpg

My takeaways from the conference were that Microsoft is very open to all members of the open source community, DevOps is a very important topic and also the following points from the PowerShell team

PowerShell Team want YOU to contribute.
Interact with them
File bugs
Feature Requests
Documentation
Tests
Code

and

Fixing is better than complaining 🙂 @HemanMahawar #psconfasia You can help fix the documentation. Use the contribute button on the doc

and

If you are thinking of starting or run a PowerShell usergroup Microsoft would like help. Tag 1 of the team such as @ANGELCALVOS #psconfasia

Special thanks and congratulations must go to Matt, Milton, Sebastian and Ben for their excellent organisation and for creating an awesome event. I am looking forward to seeing how they can better it next year and also hoping that seeing all the fabulous speakers and sessions will inspire some attendees from this years event to share their own knowledge and experience at local user groups and even next years conference.

Some Pester Tests for SQL Defaults

When I was at PowerShell Conference EU in Hannover last month (The videos are available now – click here and the slides and code here) I found out about Irwin Strachans Active Directory Operations Test which got me thinking.

I decided to do the same for my usual SQL Set-up. Treating all of your servers to the same defaults makes it even easier to manage at scale remotely.

I am comfortable with using SMO to gather and change properties on SQL Instances so I started by doing this

        It 'Should have a default Backup Directory of F:\SQLBACKUP\BACKUPS' {
$Scriptblock = {
[void][reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName('Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo');
$srv = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server .
return $srv.BackupDirectory}
$State = Invoke-Command -ComputerName ROB-SURFACEBOOK -ScriptBlock $Scriptblock
$State |Should Be 'F:\SQLBACKUP\BACKUPS'

This is the how to find the properties that you want

  ## Load the Assemblies
[void][reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName('Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo');
## Create a Server SMO object
$srv = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server SERVERNAME

## Explore it
$srv|gm

## If you find an array pick the first one and expand and then explore that
$srv.Databases[0] | select *
$srv.Databases[0] | gm

I quickly found as I added more tests that it was taking a long time to perform the tests (about 5 seconds each test) and that it took an age to fail each of the tests if the server name was incorrect or the server unavailable.

I fixed the first one by testing with a ping before running the tests

   ## Check for connectivity
if((Test-Connection $Server -count 1 -Quiet) -eq $false){
Write-Error 'Could not connect to $Server'
$_
continue
}

The continue is there because I wanted to loop through an array of servers

I improved the performance using a remote session and a custom object

      Describe "$Server" {
BeforeAll {
$Scriptblock = {
[pscustomobject]$Return = @{}
$srv = ''
$SQLAdmins = $Using:SQLAdmins
[void][reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName('Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo');
$srv = New-Object Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.SMO.Server $Server
$Return.DBAAdminDb = $Srv.Databases.Name.Contains('DBA-Admin')
$Logins = $srv.Logins.Where{$_.IsSystemObject -eq $false}.Name
$Return.SQLAdmins = @(Compare-Object $Logins $SQLAdmins -SyncWindow 0).Length - $Logins.count -eq $SQLAdmins.Count
$SysAdmins = $Srv.Roles['sysadmin'].EnumMemberNames()
$Return.SQLAdmin = @(Compare-Object $SysAdmins $SQLAdmins -SyncWindow 0).Length - $SysAdmins.count -eq $SQLAdmins.Count
$Return.BackupDirectory = $srv.BackupDirectory
$Return.DataDirectory = $srv.DefaultFile

The BeforeAll script block is run, as it sounds like it should, once before all of the tests, BeforeEach would run once before each of the tests. I define an empty custom object and then create an SMO object and add the properties I am interested in testing to it. I then return the custom object at the end

   $Return.Alerts82345Exist = ($srv.JobServer.Alerts |Where {$_.Messageid -eq 823 -or $_.Messageid -eq 824 -or $_.Messageid -eq 825}).Count
$Return.Alerts82345Enabled = ($srv.JobServer.Alerts |Where {$_.Messageid -eq 823 -or $_.Messageid -eq 824 -or $_.Messageid -eq 825 -and $_.IsEnabled -eq $true}).Count
$Return.SysDatabasesFullBackupToday = $srv.Databases.Where{$_.IsSystemObject -eq $true -and $_.Name -ne 'tempdb' -and $_.LastBackupDate -lt (Get-Date).AddDays(-1)}.Count
Return $Return
}
try {
$Return = Invoke-Command -ScriptBlock $Scriptblock -ComputerName $Server -ErrorAction Stop
}
catch {
Write-Error "Unable to Connect to $Server"
$Error
continue

I was then able to test against the property of the custom object

   It 'Should have Alerts for Severity 20 and above' {
$Return.Alerts20SeverityPlusExist | Should Be 6
}
It 'Severity 20 and above Alerts should be enabled' {
$Return.Alerts20SeverityPlusEnabled | Should Be 6
}
It 'Should have alerts for 823,824 and 825' {
$Return.Alerts82345Exist |Should Be 3
}
It 'Alerts for 823,824 and 825 should be enebled' {
$Return.Alerts82345Enabled |Should Be 3
}

Occasionally, for reasons I haven’t explored I had to test against the value property of the returned object

          It "The Full User Database Backup should be scheduled Weekly $OlaUserFullSchedule" {
$Return.OlaUserFullSchedule.value | Should Be $OlaUserFullSchedule
}

I wanted to be able to run the tests against environments or groups of servers with different default values so I parameterised the Test Results as well and then the logical step was to turn it into a function and then I could do some parameter splatting. This also gives me the opportunity to show all of the things that I am currently giving parameters to the test for

   $Parms = @{
Servers = 'SQLServer1','SQLServer2','SQLServer3';
SQLAdmins = 'THEBEARD\Rob','THEBEARD\SQLDBAsAlsoWithBeards';
BackupDirectory = 'C:\MSSQL\Backup';
DataDirectory = 'C:\MSSQL\Data\';
LogDirectory = 'C:\MSSQL\Logs\';
MaxMemMb = '4096';
Collation = 'Latin1_General_CI_AS';
TempFiles = 4 ;
OlaSysFullFrequency = 'Daily';
OlaSysFullStartTime = '21:00:00';
OlaUserFullSchedule = 'Weekly';
OlaUserFullFrequency = 1 ;## 1 for Sunday
OlaUserFullStartTime = '22:00:00';
OlaUserDiffSchedule = 'Weekly';
OlaUserDiffFrequency = 126; ## 126 for every day except Sunday
OlaUserDiffStartTime = '22:00:00';
OlaUserLogSubDayInterval = 15;
OlaUserLoginterval = 'Minute';
HasSPBlitz = $true;
HasSPBlitzCache = $True;
HasSPBlitzIndex = $True;
HasSPAskBrent = $true;
HASSPBlitzTrace =  $true;
HasSPWhoisActive = $true;
LogWhoIsActiveToTable = $true;
LogSPBlitzToTable = $true;
LogSPBlitzToTableEnabled = $true;
LogSPBlitzToTableScheduled = $true;
LogSPBlitzToTableSchedule = 'Weekly';
LogSPBlitzToTableFrequency = 2 ; # 2 means Monday
LogSPBlitzToTableStartTime  = '03:00:00'}

Test-SQLDefault @Parms

I have some other tests which always return what I want, particularly the firewall rules which you will have to modify to suit your own environment

To be able to run this you will need to have the Pester Module. If you are using Windows 10 then it is installed by default, if not

  Find-Module –Name 'Pester' | Install-Module

You can find more about Pester here and here and also these videos from the conference
You can find the tests on GitHub here and I will continue to add to the defaults that I check.
This is not a replacement for other SQL configuration tools such as PBM but it is a nice simple way of giving a report on the current status of a SQL installation either at a particular point in time when something is wrong or after an installation prior to passing the server over to another team or into service

.

DBA Database scripts are on Github

It started with a tweet from Dusty

Tweets

The second session I presented at the fantastic PowerShell Conference Europe was about using the DBA Database to automatically install DBA scripts like sp_Blitz, sp_AskBrent, sp_Blitzindex from Brent Ozar , Ola Hallengrens Maintenance Solution , Adam Mechanics sp_whoisactive , This fantastic script for logging the results from sp_whoisactive to a table , Extended events sessions and other goodies for the sanity of the DBA.

By making use of the dbo.InstanceList in my DBA database I am able to target instances, by SQL Version, OS Version, Environment, Data Centre, System, Client or any other variable I choose. An agent job that runs every night will automatically pick up the instances and the scripts that are marked as needing installing. This is great when people release updates to the above scripts allowing you to target the development environment and test before they get put onto live.

I talked to a lot of people in Hannover and they all suggested that I placed the scripts onto GitHub and after some how-to instructions from a few people (Thank you Luke) I spent the weekend updating and cleaning up the code and you can now find it on GitHub here

github

I have added the DBA Database project, the Powershell scripts and Agent Job creation scripts to call those scripts and everything else I use. Some of the DBA Scripts I use (and links to those you need to go and get yourself for licensing reasons) and the Power Bi files as well. I will be adding some more jobs that I use to gather other information soon.

Please go and have a look and see if it is of use to you. It is massively customisable and I have spoken to various people who have extended it in interesting ways so I look forward to hearing about what you do with it.

As always, questions and comments welcome